O’ROURKE’S PEAK CELLARS MASTERWORKS II

THEMES & INNOVATIONS

MEAGHAN WILLIAMS | DOUBLE BASS

THEMES & INNOVATIONS

GUEST ARTIST

MEAGHAN WILLIAMS | DOUBLE BASS

Kelowna: Friday, November 22, 2019 7:30 pm
Penticton: Saturday, November 23, 2019 7:30 pm
Vernon: Sunday, November 24, 2019 7:00 pm

 

Ralph Vaughan Williams Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
Mark Haney Placentia Bay: Summer of 1941 (World Premiere)
Edward Elgar Enigma Variations, Op. 36

 

All of these works begin with a theme: one borrowed, one created and one taken from the pages of history. Vaughan Williams reached back to the 16th century to create his Fantasia. Elgar created his own enigmatic theme with variations based on each of his close friends. Mark Haney’s Bass Concerto is a world premiere. Composed especially for our own Meaghan Williams and the OSO for our 60th Anniversary, it is inspired by hymn tunes played at a secret World War II meeting between Churchill and Roosevelt in Placentia, Newfoundland.


INSIDER FACTS

OH, CANADA

Mark Haney is an eclectic composer and performer who is deeply motivated by issues of Canadian identity, culture and community. John Bolton’s movie Aim for the Roses - which became a sensation at the HotDocs Festival - was inspired by Mark’s album of the same name, in celebration of the daredevil spirit of Canadian stuntman Ken Carter.

 

UNIQUE

At the time of its 1910 world premiere at Gloucester Cathedral, Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia was labelled “a queer, mad work by an odd fellow from Chelsea” by the cathedral’s organist.

MYSTERIOUS

Elgar repeatedly implied that his Enigma Variations contained “a counterpoint on some well-known melody which is never heard”. He took this mystery to his grave.

This show is all about paying tributes and quoting others to create something brand new.  Mark’s new bass concerto written for Meaghan is the thing I am most looking forward to this year. A WORLD PREMIERE BRINGS SUCH A SENSE OF OCCASION to a concert, especially during this exciting 60th anniversary season. And yes, Vaughan Williams and Elgar are pretty good too.

Rosemary Thomson